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NHS Rainbow Badges

 

An artists impression of the NHS rainbow badge

Have you spotted our NHS rainbow badges?

You may have seen some of our staff wearing NHS rainbow badges. The badges are just one way to show that Evelina London is an open, non-judgemental and inclusive place for people that identify as LGBT+.

LGBT+ stands for lesbian, gay bisexual, transgender and the + simply means that we are inclusive of all identities, regardless of how people define themselves.

If you see someone wearing a badge, you can ask them about it. The badge is a reminder that you can talk to our staff about who you are and how you feel. They will do their best to get support for you if you need it.

About the rainbow badges initiative

Growing from a conversation and shared experiences between colleagues, the initiative aims to make a positive difference by promoting a message of inclusion.

Many young LGBT+ people say that they do not have an adult they can turn to or confide in. We believe that people who work in healthcare can play a key role in making things better.

If you want to find out more about the initative, you can email rainbowbadge@gstt.nhs.uk.

Evelina London staff can apply to wear a badge online. Search 'rainbow badges' on the intranet (GTi).

Information for young people

Talking about sexuality and gender, and how you feel about it, can be difficult, especially at first.

People wearing a rainbow badge are there to listen, support and to help you to seek help if you need it.

There are some great resources to find out more about gender and sexuality, most of them online.

Juno Dawson’s This Book Is Gay, written by a young adult author and former PSHE teacher, is a book that aims to ‘smash the myths and prejudices surrounding sexual orientation and gender identity’.

Stonewall have a great guide to ‘Coming out as a young person’, which gives lots of answers to questions young people often have when they are thinking about coming out, or are wondering if they are lesbian, gay or bi.

Young people working with Gendered Intelligence and the Department of Health have written ‘A guide for young trans people in the UK’. It has lots of useful information if you feel that your gender identity is different to the one you were assigned when you were born.

More information about gender identity can be found on the NHS information website and GIDS (The Gender Identity Development Service) website. GIDS is a highly specialised clinic that supports young people in relation to gender identity

The Albert Kennedy Trust, provide support for LGBT+ young people who may be living in a violent, abusive or hostile environment, who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

©  Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust.
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